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Thread: Mosin Nagant Chamber Cleaning.

  1. #1
    Elite Members Dale Gribble's Avatar
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    Default Mosin Nagant Chamber Cleaning.

    So while shooting some lacquered surplus ammo through my MN I had the bolt jam up really well.

    Finally got it opened again (with some help from 7.62.net ) and cleaned the chamber with a 12 gauge brush wrapped in a hoppes 9 soak patch.

    I read several posts about using deleading wool, which looks just like a stainless steel pot scrubber to me. Anyone use deleading wool to clean a MN chamber? Any tips?
    When buying and selling are controlled by legislation, the first things to be bought and sold are legislators.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Fixxxer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Gribble View Post
    Any tips?
    Don't fire lacquered ammunition.

    Sorry... that's all I've got.
    - A Wizard Under the Sheets

  3. #3

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    Use copper wool, not steel wool. The copper kind won't hurt your bore/chamber. I used to buy a brand called Chore Boy, the only place I could find it though was at those really run down grocery stores that look like they haven't been cleaned since the 70's.

  4. #4

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    Dale Gribble
    I'll share the youtube video that Ceddie sent to me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXC_PQkLkNA

    I havent tried this exactly because i dont have J B Borebright. I have dipped a 20 gauge wire brush in Hoppes 9 and hooked it up to a drill, which was ineffective. As the guy says on the video, J B Borebright is more abrasive. I am also considering plugging up the muzzle end and targeting the chamber with the electrolysis method of cleaning.

    Let me know if you come up with a viable solution. If anyone has a good bore cleaner like J B Borebright, especially one you can buy locally, I would appreciate the suggestion.
    Thanks
    Jonathan

  5. #5
    Elite Members tommyboy4090's Avatar
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    Default

    on another thread several people were talking about never dull not abrasive but works with chemicals. if you embed a 20 ga brush with it it might work.
    "Religion is the only thing keeping the poor from killing the rich"

  6. #6

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    Dale,

    this might be something different but my friends MN would lockup real good. We would have to use a hammer to free it. After much cleaning of everything led to no avail we were stumped. So we figured the"bring the hammer to the range and use it to when it jams" method was the best. After a couple range trips we Used the hammer less and less and now it works great. I think we just had to "break in" the bolt. So my advice: bring a hammer and use it with pride.

  7. #7

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    Electrolysis will not work because lacquer is not conductive. You would have to use that process long enough to remove an entire layer of metal from the chamber before the substance broke off from the surface...

    Abrasive media/solvent which is harder than plastic but isn't as hard as steel is your only real choice.

  8. #8
    Elite Members SgtR's Avatar
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    Soviet doctrine for the Mosin Nagant was to LIGHTLY OIL the rounds when they were unboxed and put in the ammo pouch. This helped prevent the lacquered steel cases from rusting and also helpd prevent "sticky bolt" syndrome. Look around and you'll find lots of "thou shalt not" statements about oiling ammo, but they don't perzakly apply to the Mosin Nagant.

    The thing is... there can be a variety of causes for a sticking bolt. Lacquer can be one, but if you clean anything out of the chamber it's probably not lacquer, but rather dried cosmoline. Sometimes with dried cosmoline you can see small black splotches, typically just 1 or 2 smaller than a BB, on an extracted case. You can also have a rusted or in some other way rough or damaged chamber. I have a Royal Irish Constabulary Carbine that cartridges come out of looking sort of krinkly... from a rusted or corroded chamber.

    But a thing to be aware of is that excess headspace can cause stuck cases, and excess headspace can be dangerous... though it's hard to say how dangerous and how bad excess headspace has to be to become dangerous. The first Mosin Nagant I ever bought was a shot-out Romanian M-44 with excess headspace. Cases stuck like cement and it had excess head space, but a change of bolt heads fixed both problems.

    I hope that when you speak of hitting a bolt with a hammer you are referring to a brass hammer. Beating steel on steel on a firearm is not a habit to get into... I carry brass mallets and punches of several sizes with me to the range to adjust sights. The largest one does a good job on bolts, too... and they are cheap at Harbor Freight.

    Today I got a 1917 Izhevsk ex-Dragoon with a 1928 Izhevesk barrel and East German property mark. It's in 91/30 configuration now but obviously did not start out that way. There's a little frost in the grooves but the lands are strong so it should shoot as good as any of my 91/30s, which is pretty damn good... but neat thing about it is its history spanning from the Czar, through Great War, the Revolution and Civil War, to the Great Patriotic War, and finally Soviet occupied East Germany.
    Thoſe who would give up eſſential Liberty, to purchaſe a little temporary Safety, DESERVE neither Liberty nor Safety. - Pennſylvannia Aſſembly, 1755

  9. #9
    Old Ladies
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    Quote Originally Posted by SgtR View Post
    Soviet doctrine for the Mosin Nagant was to LIGHTLY OIL the rounds when they were unboxed and put in the ammo pouch. This helped prevent the lacquered steel cases from rusting and also helpd prevent "sticky bolt" syndrome. Look around and you'll find lots of "thou shalt not" statements about oiling ammo, but they don't perzakly apply to the Mosin Nagant.

    The thing is... there can be a variety of causes for a sticking bolt. Lacquer can be one, but if you clean anything out of the chamber it's probably not lacquer, but rather dried cosmoline. Sometimes with dried cosmoline you can see small black splotches, typically just 1 or 2 smaller than a BB, on an extracted case. You can also have a rusted or in some other way rough or damaged chamber. I have a Royal Irish Constabulary Carbine that cartridges come out of looking sort of krinkly... from a rusted or corroded chamber.

    But a thing to be aware of is that excess headspace can cause stuck cases, and excess headspace can be dangerous... though it's hard to say how dangerous and how bad excess headspace has to be to become dangerous. The first Mosin Nagant I ever bought was a shot-out Romanian M-44 with excess headspace. Cases stuck like cement and it had excess head space, but a change of bolt heads fixed both problems.

    I hope that when you speak of hitting a bolt with a hammer you are referring to a brass hammer. Beating steel on steel on a firearm is not a habit to get into... I carry brass mallets and punches of several sizes with me to the range to adjust sights. The largest one does a good job on bolts, too... and they are cheap at Harbor Freight.

    Today I got a 1917 Izhevsk ex-Dragoon with a 1928 Izhevesk barrel and East German property mark. It's in 91/30 configuration now but obviously did not start out that way. There's a little frost in the grooves but the lands are strong so it should shoot as good as any of my 91/30s, which is pretty damn good... but neat thing about it is its history spanning from the Czar, through Great War, the Revolution and Civil War, to the Great Patriotic War, and finally Soviet occupied East Germany.
    A mighty fine read to start the day. Thank you.

  10. #10
    Elite Members Dale Gribble's Avatar
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    Default Are they copper all the way through?

    All of the chore boy copper wool/scrubbers I've found are copper coated steel.
    When buying and selling are controlled by legislation, the first things to be bought and sold are legislators.
    P. J. O'Rourke


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